Highlighted publications

Responding to the Global Pandemic: A Pulse of the Well-Being of Clubhouse Communities Moving Virtual

Michon, A., Hinchey, L., Pernice, F., Drews, J., Price, M., Christian, J., Rice, K., & Kellogg, L. (2021). Responding to the Global Pandemic: A Pulse of the Well-Being of Clubhouse Communities Moving Virtual. Journal of psychosocial rehabilitation and mental health, 1–13. Advance online publication.

Keywords
COVID-19 pandemic
Clubhouse
Engagement
Virtual communities
Well-being

Clubhouse communities rapidly responded to the COVID-19 pandemic to keep members connected as psychosocial rehabilitation programs were globally disrupted. This investigation aims to elucidate how Clubhouse directors responded to the pandemic and their members' needs, while also directly assessing the needs and well-being of members. This study utilized secondary data from Director and Member surveys designed to capture Clubhouse status, member engagement, and measures of well-being. Descriptive statistics and correlation coefficients were computed across data from directors (n = 140) and members (n = 1136). Directors across 19 countries indicated that the majority of Clubhouses closed and were engaging with members using a variety of technologies, primarily Zoom videoconferencing. For members, greater levels of virtual Clubhouse engagement were positively correlated with physical and mental well-being and negatively correlated with hospitalization rates. This study provides support for an association between virtual Clubhouse engagement and well-being. Repeated measures studies are needed to further investigate this association. 

Why We Come: Clubhouse Members Seek Connection, Purpose and Meaning

Pernice, F.M., Price, M.H. & Rice, K. W. (2021). Why We Come: Clubhouse Members Seek Connection, Purpose and Meaning. Community Mental Health Journal 57, 446–456.

Fountain House and Community Psychiatry

Pernice, F., D’Angelo, Dudek, K.,Michon, A., Aquilla, R. (In Press). Fountain House and Community Psychiatry. In W. Sowers, H. McQuistion, J. Ranz, J. Maus Feldman P. Runnels; (Eds.) Textbook of Community Psychiatry,Springer Publication (Spring 2021).

Curriculum ideologies

Crowley, C. B. (in press). Curriculum ideologies. In M. F. He & W. H. Schubert (eds.), The Oxford Encyclopedia of Curriculum Studies. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. DOI: 10.1093/acrefore/9780190264093.013.1033

Keywords
Curriculum
Ideology
Hidden curriculum

The study of the curriculum and educational knowledge is a study of ideology. The curriculum is never neutral. It always reflects or embodies ideological positions. Ideologies present within the curriculum are negotiated and formulated through multilayered processes of strategic compromise, assent, and resistance. And as such, the curriculum ideologies become operationalized in both overt and hidden means—constructing subjects and objects of knowledge in active as well as passive ways. Teaching is always a political act, and discussions and debates over curriculum ideologies have a long history within the field of curriculum studies. In terms of its function related to the organization and valuing of knowledge, it remains important to recognize not only the contested nature of the curriculum but also how such contestations have ideological dimensions in the framing of the curriculum.

Perceptions of classroom quality and well-being among Black women teachers of young children

 Edwards, E.B., Patton-Terry, N., Bingham, G., Singer, J. (2021). Perceptions of classroom quality and well-being among Black women teachers of young children. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 29(56), 2-27.

Keywords
Early childhood education
Black feminist research
Black women teachers
Well-Being
Classroom quality

Concerns about preschool effectiveness have increasingly led to early childhood education policy changes focused on teacher quality. While the intention in these reforms is to ensure the educational well-being of children, they rarely take into account the impact policies have on teachers. Additionally, child care work is a feminized profession with distinct social experiences along lines of race and class. Black women early child care teachers live in poverty at rates disproportionate to their white counter-parts. Through Black feminist focus group research, this paper documents perceptions of early childhood education quality mandates in Georgia and their impact on the well-being of 44 Black women teachers of infants, toddlers, and pre-school age children. Findings suggest that the call for quality complicates Black teachers’ work, adds un-due financial and emotional stress that takes a toll on their well-being and interrupts personal dynamics with their loved ones. It calls for anti-racist and anti-sexist pay equality as a way to interrupt both the stressors exacted by the field and the socio-historical processes devaluing Black women’s work with children.

Intersectionality for Contextualizing Teachers’ Work in Transnational Education Policy Research

Robert, S. A., Yu, M., & Lewis, D. (2021). Intersectionality for Contextualizing Teachers’ Work in Transnational Education Policy Research. Educational Studies. DOI: 10.1080/00131946.2021.1904930

The article argues for intersectionality as analytical concept for transnational education policy analyses of teachers’ work. We first lay out the conceptual and methodological groundwork, and then revisit two case studies of teachers’ work to deepen understanding of the conceptual framework for intersectional transnational education policy analysis. The multi-scaled (individual-relational-systemic) nature of policy processes melds with intertwined oppressive systems to shape who teaches whom what where and why. We draw attention to teaching as work, labor, an occupation, whose contours are being dramatically altered by never-ending crises and neoliberal education projects. We find that the demands of the framework are quite demanding, but promising to theorize change to teachers’ work and their role in policy processes.

Examining situational interest in physical education: A new inventory. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education

Shen, B., Wang, H., & Bo, J. (in press). Examining situational interest in physical education: A new inventory. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education. 

Maintenance of a physical activity program in children with autism spectrum disorders

Dong, L., Shen, B., Pang, Y., Zhang, M., & Bo, J. (2021). Maintenance of a physical activity program in children with autism spectrum disorders. Perceptual and Motor Skills. DOI: 10.1177/00315125211010053

Keywords
Physical activity
ASD
Maintenance

Profiles of health-related quality of life and their relationships with happiness, physical activity, and fitness

 Shen, B., Wang, H., & Bo, J. (2020). Profiles of health-related quality of life and their relationships with happiness, physical activity, and fitness. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport. DOI: 10.1080/02701367.2020.1822985. 

Keywords
Physical activity
Emotion
Well being

Advancing an ecological approach to chronic absenteeism: Evidence from Detroit

Singer, J., Pogodzinski, B., Lenhoff, S. W., & Cook, W. (2021). Advancing an ecological approach to chronic absenteeism: Evidence from Detroit. Teachers College Record, 123(4).

Keywords
Absenteeism
Urban education
Social policy

Chronic absenteeism has received increased attention from educational leaders and policy makers, in part because of the association between attendance and important student outcomes. Student attendance is influenced by a range of student-, school-, and community-level characteristics, suggesting that a comprehensive and multilayered approach to addressing chronic absenteeism is warranted, particularly in high-poverty urban districts. Given the complexity of factors associated with chronic absenteeism, we draw from ecological systems theory to study absenteeism in Detroit, which has the highest rate of chronic absence of major cities in the country. Student-, neighborhood-, and school-level factors were significant predictors of chronic absenteeism in Detroit. Students were more likely to be chronically absent if they were economically disadvantaged, received special education services, moved schools or residences during the year, lived in neighborhoods with more crime and residential blight, and went to schools with more economically disadvantaged students and less stable student populations. Macro-level factors were also significantly correlated with citywide rates of absenteeism.

Education as Community Mobilization: Minjian Society and the Education of Migrant Children in China

Yu, M. (2021). Education as Community Mobilization: Minjian Society and the Education of Migrant Children in China. Educational Studies. DOI: 10.1080/00131946.2021.1892688.

Keywords

Community mobilization
Minjian
Collective action

Grassroots migrant organizations, especially schools serving migrant children, function as centers of collective action which address the needs of the community and counter the deficit notions of migrant students and their families, by illuminating the powerful ways that migrant teachers and students utilize various forms of community cultural wealth. Situating in the context of migrant communities’ social and political struggles in urban cities, this article aims to demonstrate the mobilization in China’s migrant communities as teachers and activists work to provide educational opportunities for migrant children and to explore the ways in which their actions changed community members’ perceptions of who they are, what they can do, and how they can do it.

#HealthyKidsQuarantined: Supporting schools and families with virtual physical activity, physical education, and nutrition education during the coronavirus pandemic

Whalen, L., Barcelona, J., Centeio, E., McCaughtry, N. (in press). #HealthyKidsQuarantined: Supporting schools and families with virtual physical activity, physical education, and nutrition education during the coronavirus pandemic. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 40(2).

Keywords
CSPAP
Physical education
Quarantine

When COVID-19 shuttered Michigan schools, 52 elementary and middle schools state-wide were implementing comprehensive health programs, including the integration of physical activity (PA), physical education (PE), and nutrition education (NE). To support the transition to a virtual learning environment, #HealthyKidsQuarantined was launched providing virtual PA, PE, and NE curriculum, programs, and resources. Content was distributed via email weekly to teachers and families alongside a daily social media campaign that disseminated resources to a national audience. Results identified significant content usage by schools (21,300 views/downloads) and engagement through social media (9,800 views/downloads). Teachers, students, and families expressed value in the healthy living content provided, stating it was needed support in a time of chaos. Results suggest that providing virtual health content is a feasible way to sustain school and family investment in comprehensive youth health virtually, especially during the time of a pandemic. Further, by utilizing multiple dissemination strategies, virtual programming may be an ideal mechanism to expand reach.

The N-Pact factor, replication, power, and quantitative research in APAQ

Martin, J. & Martin, D. (in press). The N-Pact factor, replication, power, and quantitative research in APAQ. Kinesiology Review

Factor structure of the barriers to physical activity scale for youth with Visual Impairments

Martin, J., Snapp, E., Moore, W., Armstrong, E. & Lieberman, L. (in press). Factor structure of the barriers to physical activity scale for youth with Visual Impairments. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly.

Curriculum of migrant communities in mainland china

Yu, M. (2021). Curriculum of migrant communities in mainland china. In Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education. Oxford University Press.

Keywords
Migrant children schools
Curriculum
Community

The establishment of the community schools for migrant children and the development of curriculum for migrant children in China’s migrant communities speak to the critical questions concerning whose knowledge counts and what is worthwhile for children from underserved communities. The spaces provided by the migrant children schools encouraged the formation of a sense of solidarity among migrant students, their families, and teachers, as well as active members outside the communities. The sense of solidarity was reflected by the blurred boundary between schools and familial spaces. Located inside migrant communities, migrant children schools contributed to the formation of a sense of collectivity among the students, their teachers, their families, and other members of the migrant communities. Many of the schools, regardless of size, number of teachers, with permits or without official recognition, organized various activities and opportunities to bring personal, family, and community experiences into school curriculum and extracurricular activities, or to encourage everyone to join community events.

Photovoice research with disabled girls of color: Exposing how schools (re)produce inequities through school geographies and learning tools

Miller, A. L., & Kurth, J. A. (2021). Photovoice research with disabled girls of color: Exposing how schools (re)produce inequities through school geographies and learning tools. Disability & Society, Advance online publication.

Keywords
Disabled girls of color
Photovoice
Intersectionality

Across the globe, disabled girls of color have unique school experiences and perspectives. However, they are often left out of educational research. In addition, their experiences are not included in conversations focused on transforming school systems and practices, even though they have solutions for educational equity and justice. Grounded in intersectionality and critical spatial theory, this study expands current understandings of how school systems and practices impact disabled youth of color broadly by considering the distinct intersectional educational trajectories of disabled girls of color in middle and high school in the United States. Through their counter-narratives, photographs, and maps, focal participants revealed how materializations (e.g. school geographies, learning tools) and adult actions impacted their academic and social opportunities at school. This study adds to the current literature with a purposeful focus on the experiences and solutions of disabled girls of color. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Validation of the Utilization of Climate and Motivational Measures from the Physical Activity Setting to the College Laboratory Setting

Wineinger, T. O. , Fry, M. D., & Moore, E. W. G. (accepted Jan 2021). Validation of the Utilization of Climate and Motivational Measures from the Physical Activity Setting to the College Laboratory Setting. Journal of Biological Education. 

Keywords
Motivational climate
Measure development

The purpose of this study, grounded in the Achievement Goal Perspective Theory (AGPT) and a Caring framework, was to effectively adapt previously validated measures of caring, task-involving (CTI), and ego-involving (EI) climates for college exercise classes to the college biology laboratory setting. The items’ measurement quality was assessed over two studies. Students (NStudy1 = 249, female 73%; NStudy2 = 199, female 78%) enrolled in biology laboratory courses were invited to complete a survey during the last two weeks of their laboratory course. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) revealed overall good fit; however, two EI items had low loadings, so their wording was revised for Study 2. CFA results of Study 2 provided reliability and validity support for the use of these relatively brief and easy to administer measures in the college laboratory setting. This research provides additional support for creating CTI climates in the college laboratory setting.

To Be It, You MUST See It: Providing Diverse STEM Role Models for All Students

Schumaker Chadde, J., Emmert, A., Teisan, J.,Yarema,S., Ram, J.L.,Tate, M. (2021). To Be It, You MUST See It: Providing Diverse STEM Role Models for All Students. "LINKS" 73,(2). p. 6-8. https://issuu.com/msta-mich/docs/2021_msta_links_-_winter

Keywords
STEM education
Representation
Role-models

Exposure to role models is a proven mechanism for fostering career aspirations in young people. However, finding STEM role models of color can be a challenge; with minority representation in STEM fields significantly lower than white or Asian Americans (NSF, 2017). To address these challenges, educators from Detroit’s Belle Isle Aquarium/Belle Isle Conservancy, Michigan Technological University, and Wayne State University, created a multi-faceted project to pique interest in science and STEM careers amongst 5th grade students in the Detroit Public School Community District (DPSCD),funded by a four-year National Science Foundation grant.

Patterns of Preservice Teachers’ Digital Text and Tool Integration in Literacy Instruction

Christ, T., Baxa, J., & Arya, P. (2020). Patterns of Preservice Teachers’ Digital Text and Tool Integration in Literacy Instruction. Journal of Literacy and Technology, 21(1), 159-203.

Keywords
Literacy instruction
Technology integration

The DigiLit Framework was used to score the characteristics of 39 preservice teachers’ (PTs) selections and integrations of digital texts or tools across 88 of their video-recorded literacy lessons with children. Children’s outcomes for each lesson were scored for (a) transcendent literacy skill or strategy use (e.g., inference) and (b) digital feature use related to the lesson objective (e.g., hotspot activation). Relations amongst characteristics of PTs’ selection/integration and children’s outcomes were analyzed using multivariate, multilevel logit regression models. Both children’s transcendent literacy and digital feature use outcomes were significantly improved (a) for word study and emergent literacy objectives, (b) when PTs selected highly interactive texts/tools, and (c) when PTs’ guided children’s practices. Interaction effects were found for particular objectives and PT practices, suggesting potential guidelines for effective practices. Further, while PTs’ integration effectiveness rates were fairly high overall (62-76%), just 31% of PTs effectively capitalized on digital features.

Patterns of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge in preservice-teachers’ literacy lesson planning

Arya, P., Christ, T., & Wu, Wen. (2020). Patterns of technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge in preservice-teachers’ literacy lesson planning. Journal of Education and Learning, 9(5), 1-14. 

Keywords
Literacy Preservice Teachers
TPACK

This study explored the patterns of Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) in 45 preservice teachers’ literacy lesson plans that integrated digital texts/tools. A priori coding and content analysis were used to identify preservice teachers’ demonstrations of combinations of TPACK constructs. Findings indicated that preservice teachers demonstrated TPACK (41%) and combined Technological Content Knowledge and Pedagogical Content Knowledge most frequently (42%), Pedagogical Content Knowledge less frequently (13%), and other patterns rarely. This study extended previous research by identifying patterns of literacy preservice teachers’ demonstrations of TPACK in their elementary literacy lesson plans. It also demonstrated new ways of combining TPACK constructs (i.e., Technological Content Knowledge and Pedagogical Content Knowledge, Technological Content Knowledge and Technological Pedagogical Knowledge, and Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Technological Pedagogical Knowledge), which when used to code the data resulted in a more comprehensive definition of TPACK. 

Integrative and illustrative: Multimodal acquisition, comprehension, and composition

 Roberts, K. L., Meyer, C. K., Brugar, K. A., & Jimenez, L. J. (2020). Integrative and illustrative: Multimodal acquisition, comprehension, and composition. The Middle School Journal, 51, 9-17.

Keywords
Comprehension
English language arts
graphic novels
Interdisciplinary
Social Studies

In this study, we examine evidence of transfer from reading instruction to students’ learning of language arts and historical content as demonstrated by their independent writing and growth in background knowledge. We taught a unit in a sixth-grade language arts classroom in which students learned about design elements of graphic novels (e.g., line, color) and typical features (e.g., gutter, panel) to bolster reading comprehension, using a historically accurate graphic novel about the American Revolution as an anchor text. We asked, (a) When students are taught about elements of graphic novels during content-area reading instruction, in what ways are they able to demonstrate understanding of those elements in independent compositions? (b) Does this type of instruction also build historical content knowledge? Results indicate that students were able to simultaneously learn about the graphic novel form and the content of the focal text.

Counteracting dysconscious racism and ableism through fieldwork: Applying DisCrit Classroom Ecology in early childhood personnel preparation

Hancock, C. L., Morgan, C. W., & Holly Jr., J. (2021). Counteracting dysconscious racism and ableism through fieldwork: Applying DisCrit Classroom Ecology in early childhood personnel preparation. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education. Advance online publication.

Keywords
Disability critical race theory
Fieldwork
Practicum
Personnel Preparation

Early childhood personnel preparation programs must prepare future early educators who can counteract racism and ableism to provide all children with an equitable and just education. We applied Dis/ability Critical Race Theory (DisCrit) Classroom Ecology to early childhood and specifically to preschool settings. We argue that early childhood personnel preparation programs can utilize this framework to prepare preservice early educators to facilitate more equitable experiences for Children of Color with disabilities and their families. We discuss the importance of preparing future early educators to counteract racism and ableism through their fieldwork experiences. We also provide a brief overview of DisCrit in relation to early childhood personnel preparation and present DisCrit Classroom Ecology to apply the framework components to preschool fieldwork.

Leadership Development: A Fresh Look at the Need for a Focused Approach at the Campus Level

Hill, W. and Nolan, C. (2020). Leadership Development: A Fresh Look at the Need for a Focused Approach at the Campus Level. Journal of Higher Education Management, 35 (2), pp. 12-18.

Promoting Positive Health Outcomes in an Urban Community-Based Physical Activity Intervention for Preschool Aged Children on the Autism Spectrum. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

Ketcheson, L., Staples, K., Pitchford, E. A., & Loetzner, F. (2021). Promoting Positive Health Outcomes in an Urban Community-Based Physical Activity Intervention for Preschool Aged Children on the Autism Spectrum. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders (JADD), 1-15.

Keywords
Autism
Motor behavior
Health
Intervention

Background. While there is wide consensus regarding the importance of early intervention, health is rarely considered within priorities.

Methods: Twenty-five children on the autism spectrum (Mage = 4.67, SD = 0.82) participated in a 12-week physical activity intervention.

Objective: Primary objective was to examine impact of a physical activity intervention on physical activity, fitness and motor competence. Secondary objective was to examine associations between motor behavior and ASD symptoms.

Results. Ball skills (p < .001) and isometric push-up performance (p = .02) improved. Autism symptoms were associated with motor skills (r > -.49, p < .05).

Discussion. Study outcomes provide new knowledge regarding design, delivery, and measures for early interventions targeting health disparities in young children on the autism spectrum. 

Promoting Adapted Physical Activity Regardless of Language Ability in Young Children with ASD. Research Quarterly for Exercise And Sport

Ketcheson, L.R., Felzer-Kim, I., Hauck, J.L. (2020). Promoting Adapted Physical Activity Regardless of Language Ability in Young Children with ASD. Research Quarterly for Exercise And Sport. 1 – 11. 

Keywords
Intervention
Motor
Autism
Education

Purpose: There is a relationship between motor and language skills in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but little work addresses the ramifications of this relationship for professionals who teach motor skills to this population. Within a motor skills intervention, this study probed the importance of language skills for motor intervention. We examined the relationship between motor and language skills at baseline, and then the relationship between baseline language skills and motor improvements resulting from the intervention.

Method: Twenty children aged 4-6 years with ASD participated. Eleven children received 20-hrs per week of motor intervention for eight weeks. Nine children did not receive motor intervention. Language skills (Mullen Scales of Early Learning) and motor skills (Test of Gross Motor Development–2) were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Spearman correlations tested the associations between baseline language and baseline motor skills. This analysis was repeated in the intervention sample to test the association between baseline language level and response to intervention (motor skill changes from baseline to post-intervention).

Results: Prior to intervention, locomotor skills are positively correlated (p < .001) with both receptive (ρ = 0.827) and expressive (ρ = 0.722) language skills. Similarly, object-control skills are positively correlated (p < .001) with receptive (ρ = 0.779) and expressive (ρ = 0.729) language skills. However, those baseline language skills do not relate to motor change in the experimental group.

Conclusion: Results of this study suggest that motor skill programs can improve motor skills in children with ASD, regardless of pre-program language ability.

The relationship among early functional milestones and core deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Ketcheson, L.R., Pitchford, E.A., & Wentz, C.F. (2020). The relationship among early functional milestones and core deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorder, 78, 101638. 

Keywords
Motor impairment
Functional skills
Early Intervention
Core deficits

Background: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is now the highest among the developmental disabilities in the United States, with recent statistics estimates of 1 in every 54 children. While growing attention on the early intervention services is warranted, what is not well understood is the relationship between the core deficits of ASD and the early functional skills in young children with ASD. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to determine the relationship between early developmental functional skills and behavioral outcomes in the core deficits of ASD. The current study is a secondary data analysis of the Simons Foundation Powering Autism Research for Knowledge cohort from the Simons Foundation Research Initiative (SFARI). Multiple early functional milestones were significantly associated with current communication deficits, including the month of first independent walking (b = 0.11, p = .03), using words (b = -0.05, p = .02), and using combined phrases (b = 0.20, p < .001). This study represents one of the first attempts at examining relationships among the acquisition of early functional milestones and outcomes in children with ASD. 

The relationship between Developmental Coordination Disorder and concurrent deficits in social communication and repetitive behaviors among children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Ketcheson, L.R., Pitchford, E.A., & Wentz, C.F. (2021). The relationship between Developmental Coordination Disorder and concurrent deficits in social communication and repetitive behaviors among children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Autism Research.

Keywords
Autism
Developmental coordinator disorder
Motor skills 

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), characterized by core deficits in social communication and restrictive behaviors, can exhibit concurrent motor incoordination and/or intellectual disability (ID). While pervasive delays in motor behavior are common, formal diagnosis of Development Coordination Disorder (DCD) is uncommon. It is not clear how DCD and ID impact core deficits in ASD. 10,234 children with ASD, between the ages of 5 and 15 years, were included in the analysis. Parents completed online versions of the DCD Questionnaire (DCD-Q), Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) and Restrictive Behavior Scale (RBS-R). 85% of children with ASD had DCD-Q scores consistent with being at-risk for DCD, but only 14% reported a formal diagnosis. Children with ID exhibited significantly greater motor incoordination compared to children without ID (p < .001). Significantly greater core deficits were identified in both children at-risk for DCD (p < .001) and with ID (p < .001). However, the effects of DCD risk were independent of ID and exhibited a medium effect size for SCQ (η2p = .063) and a small effect size for RBS-R (η2p = .04) scores. 
 

The Longitudinal Association between Exposure to Violence and Patterns of Health Risk Behaviors among African American Youth

Hsieh, H-F., Mistry R., Lee, D. B, Scott, B., Eisman, A. B., Heinze, J. E. & Zimmerman, M.A. (accepted). The Longitudinal Association between Exposure to Violence and Patterns of Health Risk Behaviors among African American Youth. American Journal of Health Promotion.

Adapting the InPACT Intervention to Enhance Implementation Fidelity and Flexibility

Hasson, R. E., Beemer, L. R., Ajibewa, T. A., & Eisman, A. B. (2021). Adapting the InPACT Intervention to Enhance Implementation Fidelity and Flexibility. Prevention science : the official journal of the Society for Prevention Research, 10.1007/s11121-020-01199-z. Advance online publication.

Keywords
Implementation science
Physical activity interventions
Prevention

Adapting classroom-based physical activity interventions are critical for program feasibility and fidelity in low-resource elementary schools. The purpose of this pilot study was to use Replicating Effective Programs (REP) framework to tailor the Interrupting Prolonged sitting with ACTivity (InPACT) intervention and evaluate its effectiveness on program fidelity in classrooms within a low-resource school. REP was applied to adapt program packaging, teacher training, and technical assistance to disseminate Tailored InPACT, a 20-week intervention where teachers implemented 5 × 4-min activity breaks per day. Tailored InPACT was implemented in nine, 3rd-6th grade classrooms in one low-resource school in Detroit Michigan (80% qualified for free/reduced lunch). Intervention fidelity was measured via daily, weekly, and end-of-study self-report questionnaires and direct observation. Throughout the 20-week intervention period, 3rd-5th grade teachers achieved intervention dose (5 activity breaks per day at an average duration of 4 min 8 s). Sixth grade teachers did not achieve intervention dose as they were only able to implement 2 activity breaks per day at an average duration of 4 min 12 s.

“¿Yque?”: Diverse literacy experiences within a pre-college high school program

Gonzales, S.M., Lopez, J., Torres, L. and Calandrino, A. (2020). “¿Yque?”: Diverse literacy experiences within a pre-college high school program. Michigan Reading Journal, (52)2, 60-67.

In this article, four (4) Latina staff members from a college access program examine the literacy practices of the emergent bilingual high school students they assist. Many of the students enrolled in the program have recently immigrated from Guatemala. In many cases, the language spoken at home is neither English nor Spanish, but an Indigenous Guatemalan language. In addition, these students are often the first generation in their homes to receive any formal education and are the first in their families to learn to read and write. Nevertheless, the authors argue that the parents of these students still demonstrate different forms of literacy—literacies which have a long history of being discounted and marginalized within our traditional schooling structures. In this article, the authors explore these various challenges while also disrupting the “low literacy/illiteracy” trope which provides an alternative way of understanding literacy. The authors also ponder ways in which Western standards of teaching and learning can be bridged with culturally sustaining practices, as they prepare their students for post-secondary education. 

A Field Study on Runners Participating in a 161-km Footrace

Hew-Butler T. Chasing Hyponatremia: A Field Study on Runners Participating in a 161-km Footrace. SAGE Research Methods Cases: Medicine and Health Part 2. 2020.

Keywords
Hyponatremia
Ultramarathon

Exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) is a life-threatening electrolyte imbalance, biochemically defined by a blood sodium concentration ([Na+]) below 135 mmol/L. Because athletes die from brain swelling (encephalopathy) associated with severe EAH, most institutional review boards will not allow researchers to induce hyponatremia in laboratory settings. Accordingly, researchers must target athletes in field settings to investigate the risk factors, pathogenesis, and treatment of EAH. One-hundred-mile (161 km) mountain footraces, held in hot climates, provide the most favorable conditions for development of EAH. We thereby undertook an ambitious series of sodium balance studies during a 161-km ultramarathon to investigate the pathophysiology of EAH. The methods described in detail suggests that research teams can salvage novel findings when they embrace foresight, teamwork, and resilience during extreme circumstances.

Wilderness Medical Society Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia: 2019 Update

Bennett BL, Hew-Butler T, Rosner MH, Myers T, Lipman GS. Wilderness Medical Society Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia: 2019 Update. Wilderness Environ Med. 2020 Mar;31(1):50-62.

Keywords
Hyponatremia
Exercise
Hydration

The Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel in May 2018. The panel was charged with updating the WMS Practice Guidelines for Treatment of Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia (EAH) published in 2014 using evidence-based guidelines for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of EAH. Recommendations are made based on presenting with symptomatic EAH, particularly when point-of-care blood sodium testing is unavailable in the field. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balanced between the benefits and risks/burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians.

Is Exercise the Best Medicine during a COVID-19 Pandemic?

Hew-Butler T, Smith-Hale V, Van Sumeren M, Sabourin J, Levy P. Is Exercise the Best Medicine during a COVID-19 Pandemic? Comment on Constandt, B.; Thibaut, E.; De Bosscher, V.; Scheerder, J.; Ricour, M.; Willem, A. Exercising in Times of Lockdown: An Analysis of the Impact of COVID-19 on Levels and Patterns of Exercise among Adults in Belgium. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4144. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 Aug 8;17(16):5730. doi: 10.3390/ijerph17165730.

Keywords
Exercise
COVID-19
Sports

The authors editorialize whether or not all exercise (i.e. sports competition) is safe during a pandemic. The literature confirms that regular moderate exercise has clear mental, physical and metabolic health benefits, including immunological benefits in the face of communicable disease. Conversely, excessive and/or intense competitive exercise has been shown to negatively affect immune function which may exacerbate infection as well as overall SARS-coV-2 contagion. The question of whether exercise - particularly the resumption of competitive sports - is healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic remains a (hot) topic. The authors emphasize that the boundaries between safe and unsafe exercise warrants further investigation, and a Special Issue in IJERPH has been created to address this question more critically (with Hew-Butler as Guest Editor)

Toward being nobody’s darling: A womanist reframing of school culture and climate

 Edwards, E.B. (2020). Toward being nobody’s darling: A womanist reframing of school culture and climate. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 33(7), pp. 759-772.

Keywords
Black girls
School/Prison nexus
School climate

This article demonstrates how (bad) girl performances rupture the inherently violent logic undergirding exclusionary discipline through the schooling experiences of five Black girls on probation. The paper reveals a clear need for the abolition of suspension, expulsion and school-based arrest and relays a new focus on freedom dreaming for harmonious, womanist, healing-informed school climates. In so doing, it calls educators to nurture the liberatory promise in Black girls who experience school conflict by affirming their resistance, rejection, or indifference to white femininity and Black respectability. Such a move takes us away from perceptions, policies, and practices reinscribing Black girlhood as problematic and brings us toward schooling experiences that invite and honor the fullness of their being.

A comprehensive systematic review of MOOC research: Research techniques, topics, and trends from 2009 to 2019

Zhu, M., Sari, A. R., & Lee, M. M. (2020). A comprehensive systematic review of MOOC research: Research techniques, topics, and trends from 2009 to 2019. Educational Technology Research and Development 68(4), 1685-1710. doi: 10.1007/s11423-020-09798-x. 

Key Words
Massive open online courses
Research methods
Research trends

This study examines the research methods, topics, and trends of empirical MOOC research to gain a comprehensive understanding of the MOOC phenomenon through reviewing 541 empirical MOOCs research published from 2009 to 2019. The results indicate that: (1) the majority of studies adopted quantitative research methods followed by mixed research methods and qualitative research methods, (2) the most frequently adopted data collection method was survey, followed by platform database and interviews, (3) almost half of the studies used at least two data collection methods such as survey and interview, (4) the majority of researchers adopted descriptive statistics for data analysis, followed by inferential statistics and content analysis, (5) the research topics primarily focused on students, followed by design-focused, context and impact-focused, and instructor-focused. Among these student-focused topics, learner retention, learning experience, social learning, and engagement were the most mentioned, and (6) the affiliations of the first authors of the MOOC studies were mainly from the U.S. followed by China and Spain. Implications and future research were discussed.

Learning about history and culture in a mobile museum

Taylor, J.A., Hudson, T., Williams, G., and Kotcher, C. (2020). Learning about history and culture in a mobile museum. Journal of Social Studies and History Education.

Keywords
Black history
Culturally relevant teaching
Mobile museum

Scholarship on learning in the context of brick-and-mortar museums is extensive, but very little has been written on the educational value of mobile museums in schools. This study on the Black History 101 Mobile Museum shows that museums, which afford students the opportunity to experience authentic artifacts directly, enhance historical and cultural studies. In addition to generating interest, museum experiences have the potential to develop historical thinking among students. The secondary students, who participated in this study in a major Midwestern city, found the artifacts and narratives in the Black History 101 Mobile Museum to be powerful and motivational. As African Americans, the students felt that the museum’s foci were relevant to their lives. In light of the findings, collaboration between mobile museum and secondary educators on culturally relevant experiences merits consideration.

Adapting the InPACT Intervention to Enhance Implementation Fidelity and Flexibility

Hasson R.E., Beemer L., Ajibewa T.A., Eisman A.B. (in press) Adapting the InPACT Intervention to Enhance Implementation Fidelity and Flexibility. Prevention Science.

Key words
Implementation science
Physical activity interventions
School-based programs

 

Cost-effectiveness of the Adaptive Implementation of Effective Programs Trial (ADEPT): approaches to adopting implementation strategies

Eisman A.B., Hutton D.W., Prosser L.A., Smith S.N., Kilbourne A.M. (in press) Cost-effectiveness of the Adaptive Implementation of Effective Programs Trial (ADEPT): approaches to adopting implementation strategies. Implementation Science. 

Key words
Implementation science
Economic evaluation
Mental health service

Becoming a Transformative Leader: A Guide to Creating Equitable Schools

Shields, C. M. (2020), Becoming a Transformative Leader: A Guide to Creating Equitable Schools, New York: Routledge (Eye on Education)   

This book is a practical companion the the 2nd edition of Transformative Leadership in Education, New York: Routledge and is intended to offer strategies for implementing transformative leadership theory in practical situations, primarily schools.

Transformative Leadership In Action: Allyship, Advocacy & Activism

Shields, C. M. (2020), Leading to transform our world, in K.E. McKee & J. Bruce (eds), Transformative Leadership In Action: Allyship, Advocacy & Activism, Building leadership bridges 2020 annual book series of the International Leadership Association. Bingley, UK: Emerald.   

Transforming schools: Implementing transformative leadership to enhance equity and social justice

Shields, C. M. (2020), Transforming schools: Implementing transformative leadership to enhance equity and social justice, invited chapter, in C. A. Mullen (Ed/), Handbook of Social Justice Interventions in Education, Springer International Handbook,of Education.  

Disabled girls of color excavate exclusionary literacy practices and generate promising sociospatial-textual solutions

Miller, A. L. (2020). Disabled girls of color excavate exclusionary literacy practices and generate promising sociospatial-textual solutions. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Advance online publication. 

Disabled girls of color have unique intersectional schooling experiences. Yet, they are underrepresented in educational research, and often unheard. Grounded in Disability Critical Race Theory and sociocultural learning theory, this study expands current understandings of how academic and social opportunities are afforded or constrained in schools for disabled girls of color from their perspectives. Through their narratives, photographs, and maps, focal participants in middle and high school described how social and spatial practices interacted with texts and technologies and in doing so, positively and negatively impacted their literacy opportunities at school. This study adds to the current literature with an intentional focus on the gifts, strengths, and solutions of disabled girls of color. Implications for future research (e.g. conduct- ing student-led photovoice research with disabled girls of color) and generative teacher practices (e.g. using photovoice to learn about student experiences and make pedagogical changes) are discussed.

Teacher agency for inclusive education: An international scoping review

Miller, A. L., Wilt, C. L., Allcock, H., Kurth, J. A., Morningstar, M. E., & Ruppar, A. L. (2020). Teacher agency for inclusive education: An international scoping review. International Journal of Inclusive Education, Advance online publication. 

Inclusive education is contextualised within local systems and represents a continuous struggle to ensure access to meaningful and equitable education. The purpose of this scoping review was to examine international empirical studies published in peer-reviewed journals from 1999 to 2019 focused on teacher agency for inclusive education for students with disabilities in grades K-12. The conceptual framework used for this research identified teacher agency for inclusive schooling as requiring a disruption of traditional special educator identities, particularly pertaining to segregated schooling practices and deficit notions of disability. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria. The results revealed varied conceptualizations of how teacher agency promotes inclusive education. We identified the following themes related to teachers’ agentic actions towards inclusive education: (a) instructional strategies, (b) collaboration, (c) family-school-community connections, and (d) other agentic moves. Implications for future research are discussed.

Maximizing data quality and shortening survey time: Three-form planned missing data survey design

Moore, E. W. G., Lang, K. M., & Grandfield, E. M. (2020). Maximizing data quality and shortening survey time: Three-form planned missing data survey design. Psychology of Sport & Exercise. doi: 10.1016/j.psychsport.2020.101701.

Simulation studies have shown the three-form planned missing data design efficiently collects high quality data while reducing participant burden. This methodology is rarely used in sport and exercise psychology. Therefore, we conducted a re-sampling study with existing sport and exercise psychology survey data to test how three-form planned missing data survey design implemented with different item distribution approaches effect constructs’ internal measurement structure and validity. Results supported the efficacy of the three-form planned missing data survey design for cross-sectional data collection. Sample sizes of at least 300 (i.e., 100 per form) are recommended for having unbiased parameter estimates. It is also recommended items be distributed across survey forms to have representation of each facet of a construct on every form, and that a select few of these items be included across all survey forms. Further guidelines for three-form surveys based upon the results of this resampling study are provided.

Impact of COVID-19 on college student athletes’ health, performance, and psychological well-being: An executive summary on baseline data

Petrie, TA, Moore, EWG, Palmateer, T, Slavin, L. (2020). Impact of COVID-19 on college student athletes’ health, performance, and psychological well-being: An executive summary on baseline data. Denton, TX: University of North Texas.

On March 12, 2020, in the midst of an emerging COVID-19 surge within the U.S., the NCAA cancelled all winter and spring sport championships. The impact of this decision, along with the closing of the majority of college/university campuses, threw the lives and futures of hundreds of thousands of student athletes into disarray. Recognizing the potential effects of this disruption on the mental health and psychological well-being of collegiate student athletes, we launched this study. Our data collection occurred in two phases: 1) From April 10 through May 1, 2020, our survey was appended to the end of the NCAA’s Student Athlete Advisory Council (SAAC) study. Student athletes, upon completing the NCAA SAAC study, had the option of proceeding to ours. Through this mechanism, just over 215 participated. 2) From April 17 through May 23, 2020, 80 different NCAA Division I, II, and III college and university athletic departments from across the U.S. enrolled in the study and disseminated our study to their student athletes. Through this mechanism, just over 5700 participated.

Strength and Conditioning Coaches' Perceptions of Sport Psychology Strategies

Quartiroli A, Moore EWG, Zakrajsek RA. (2020). Strength and Conditioning Coaches' Perceptions of Sport Psychology Strategies. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. doi: 10.1519/jsc.0000000000003651.

Strength and conditioning coaches (SCCs) hold a central role in the development of student-athletes. Although they certainly focus on student-athletes' physical skill development, SCCs are in an ideal position to integrate mental skills into their strength and conditioning sessions. For example, sport psychology (SP) strategies can be used within strength and conditioning sessions to assist in athlete exercise execution by regulating arousal, improving concentration, confidence, as well as improve self-correction through self-talk and imagery. The purpose of this study was to assess collegiate SCCs' use of SP skills/strategies. A total sample of 415 SCCs (19.7% return rate) across the United States participated in an online survey. Although the majority of these coaches reported having less than moderate training in SP (59.9%), they also reported a moderate to high use of certain SP strategies (e.g., goal setting, self-talk). Strength and conditioning coaches' familiarity with, knowledge of, and confidence to use the SP strategies were found to be predictors of SCCs' frequency of SP strategy use. This study aimed to provide an initial exploration of SCCs' understanding and use of specific SP strategies, which was influenced by the SCCs' perceived level of preparation to use these strategies. For SCCs to be able to purposefully and confidently incorporate SP strategies into training sessions, the current study suggests the need for specific training aimed to enhance the SCCs' knowledge of and confidence in using specific SP strategies.

Economic evaluation in implementation science: Making the business case for implementation strategies

Eisman, A. B., Kilbourne, A. M., Dopp, A. R., Saldana, L., & Eisenberg, D. (2020). Economic evaluation in implementation science: Making the business case for implementation strategies. Psychiatry research, 283, 112433. 

Implementation researchers have made notable progress in developing and testing implementation strategies (i.e., highly-specified methods used to help providers improve uptake of mental health evidence-based practices: EBPs). Yet, implementation strategies are not widely applied in healthcare organizations to improve delivery of EBPs. Economic considerations are a key factor influencing the use of implementation strategies to deliver and sustain mental health evidence-based practices, in part because many health care leaders are reluctant to invest in ongoing implementation strategy support without knowing the return-on-investment. Comparative economic evaluation of implementation strategies provides critical information for payers, policymakers, and providers to make informed decisions if specific strategies are an efficient use of scarce organizational resources. Currently, few implementation studies include implementation cost data and even fewer conduct comparative economic analyses of implementation strategies. This summary will introduce clinicians, researchers and other health professionals to the economic evaluation in implementation science. We provide an overview of different economic evaluation methods, discuss differences between economic evaluation in health services and implementation science. We also highlight approaches and frameworks to guide economic evaluation of implementation, provide an example for a cognitive-behavioral therapy program and discuss recommendations.

The User-Program Interaction: How Teacher Experience Shapes the Relationship Between Intervention Packaging and Fidelity to a State-Adopted Health Curriculum

Eisman, A. B., Kilbourne, A. M., Greene, D., Jr, Walton, M., & Cunningham, R. (2020). The User-Program Interaction: How Teacher Experience Shapes the Relationship Between Intervention Packaging and Fidelity to a State-Adopted Health Curriculum. Prevention science : the official journal of the Society for Prevention Research, 21(6), 820–829. 

Intervention effects observed in efficacy trials are rarely seen when programs are broadly disseminated, underscoring the need to better understand factors influencing fidelity. The Michigan Model for Health™ (MMH) is an evidence-based health curriculum disseminated in schools throughout Michigan that is widely adopted but delivered with limited fidelity. Understanding implementation determinants and how they influence fidelity is essential to achieving desired implementation and behavioral outcomes. The study surveyed health teachers throughout Michigan (n = 171) on MMH implementation, guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. We investigated relationships between context, intervention and provider factors and dose delivered (i.e., the proportion of curriculum delivered by teachers), a fidelity dimension. We also examined whether intervention factors were moderated by provider factors to influence fidelity. Our results indicated that program packaging ratings were associated with dose delivered (fidelity). We also found that this relationship was moderated by teacher experience. The strength of this relationship diminished with increasing levels of experience, with no relationship among the most experienced teachers. Intervention adaptability was also associated with dose delivered. We found no association between health education policies (context), provider beliefs, and dose delivered. Intervention factors are important determinants of fidelity. Our results suggest that providers with more experience may need materials tailored to their knowledge and skill level to support materials' continued usefulness and fidelity long-term. Our results also suggest that promoting adaptability may help enhance fidelity. Implementation strategies that focus on systematically adapting evidence-based health programs may be well suited to enhancing the fidelity of the MMH curriculum across levels of teacher experience.

Comprehensive approaches to addressing mental health needs and enhancing school security: a hybrid type II cluster randomized trial

Eisman, A. B., Heinze, J., Kilbourne, A. M., Franzen, S., Melde, C., & McGarrell, E. (2020). Comprehensive approaches to addressing mental health needs and enhancing school security: a hybrid type II cluster randomized trial. Health & justice, 8(1), 2. 

Background: School safety is fundamental to fostering positive outcomes for children. Violence remains a critical public health issue with 8.1% of elementary and 21.8% of middle school students reporting daily or weekly bullying in 2015-16. Similarly, over half of lifetime mental health concerns become evident before age 14. Thus, elementary school is a key time for comprehensive school safety interventions. Yet, interventions are rarely delivered with fidelity in community settings. Evidence-based interventions must be complemented by implementation strategies to achieve desired public health outcomes.

Methods: We develop and test an intervention focused on promoting a positive school climate guided by a school-based 3-person leadership team (3-PLT) using a hybrid Type II design. The 3-PLT includes a School Resource Officer, (SRO), administrator and mental health services professional as a newly appointed climate specialist (CS). The interventions to be delivered include 1) Restorative justice, 2) Mental Health First Aid and 3) Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design. The CS will lead the team and coordinate implementation through a process of interactive problem solving and supports, consistent with the implementation facilitation strategy. We will conduct a cluster randomized controlled trial with staged entry over two school years in Genesee County, Michigan (n = 20 elementary schools, with 10 participating per school year). We will use a combination of data sources including data collected by schools (e.g., discipline data), a student survey, and a teacher survey. We will also conduct a process evaluation and assess implementation and sustainability through focus groups with key stakeholders, teachers, and students. Finally, we will conduct a cost-benefit analysis.

Discussion: Results from both the behavioral outcome and implementation strategy evaluations are expected to have significant implications for school safety and student well-being. This study adopts a unique approach by integrating three evidence-based programs and incorporating implementation facilitation led by the CS as part of the 3-PLT to support intervention delivery and enhance public health impact among schools in disadvantaged communities with students at risk of poor health outcomes. This study aims to create a comprehensive, well-integrated model intervention that is sustainable and can be translated to similar high-risk settings.

Digital Literacy: Do practices and applications of digital reading strategies measure up to perceptions?

Baleja, K., & Zhang, M. (2020). Digital Literacy: Do practices and applications of digital reading strategies measure up to perceptions?. Journal for the Michigan Association of Teacher Educators.

Digital literacy is an important aspect of education. Being able to successfully search digitally for information, then comprehend the material is an essential skill for students as technology continues to infiltrate our daily lives. Deciding how to teach digital literacy fluctuates greatly from one classroom to the next, as scholars continue to struggle in defining digital literacy. This mixed-method study surveyed educators across the state of Michigan, focusing on digital reading strategies, technologies, and perceptions about digital reading practices. While educators acknowledge the importance of teaching digital literacy, they lack support and professional development to sustain successful implementation. The survey found the frequency of digital reading resources to be quite low compared to beliefs on digital reading. This invites an opportunity for future research to further understand the frequency of digital literacy that is taught in the classroom.

Digital Literacy

Hicks, T., Baleja, K., & Zhang, M. (2019). Digital Literacy. In P. Moy (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies. New York: Oxford University Press.

For centuries, both the technologies of literacy—from cuneiform tablets to the printing press to, most recently, the smartphone—as well as the practices of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and visually representing have evolved. In the late 1990s, with the emergence of the hyperlinked and increasingly visual form of the Internet known as the World Wide Web, researchers, journalists, and educators began to use the term “digital literacy” to describe and differentiate emerging practices that were considered new, or at least different, from linear, text-centric literacy practices. To be digitally literate, competent learners would need to perform equally as well in face-to-face and print communication, as well as with emerging online tools such as discussions boards, instant messaging, and email. Along with the introduction of the term “digital literacy,” a number of related—and often considered synonymous—terms have emerged from various perspectives including “computer literacy,” “information communication technologies (ICT) literacy,” “information literacy,” “media literacy,” “new literacy(ies),” and “multiliteracies.” In an effort to clarify definitions and to distinguish between other entries in the Oxford Bibliographies, “digital literacy” is defined here as the complementary and interwoven skills, both technical and social, that people must employ when using Internet-based communication—including hypertext, images, audio, and video—to consume and create messages across a variety of academic, civic, and cultural contexts. Digital literacy, then, has particular significance within the realm of education. Often positioned as a set of skills and dispositions on par with—or in some cases, even more important than—traditional literacy skills of reading and writing, digital literacy has taken a prominent role in academic conversations from early childhood education through adolescent and young adult learning. Additionally, references to digital literacy are now common in conversations outside of school as well. This bibliography focuses attention on digital literacy in K-12 contexts, with reference to out-of-school and global contexts, drawing attention to the wide range of educational scholarship that embraces the study of digital literacy including research in linguistics and sociology as well as education.

Digital writing and production strategies and perceptions

Baleja, K., & Zhang, M. (2020). Digital writing and production strategies and perceptions. Journal of Literacy and Technology, 21(1), 61-109.

Digital writing is an important aspect of K-12 education. Students must be able to create and compose digital material as they collaborate and share experiences with others, both inside and outside school walls. As educators are required to teach reading and writing, literacy must become digital to keep pace with a technology-centered society. As scholars continue to struggle to define digital literacy, determining what to teach fluctuates greatly from one classroom to the
next. While research is abundant pertaining to digital literacy, past studies concentrated on specific tools or resources. Focusing on digital writing strategies, technologies, and perceptions this mixed-method study surveyed educators in Michigan about digital writing practices. Overall educators feel teaching digital literacy is important, but lack professional development to support and sustain successful implementation. Many educators are still unsure what digital literacy entails, and therefore struggle to teach the concepts. 

Rethinking online assessments: Screencasting as an evaluation resource

Baleja, K. (2020). Rethinking online assessments: Screencasting as an evaluation resource. In Teaching, Technology, and Teacher Education during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Stories from the Field. (pp. 671-674). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).

As we transition to online learning formats in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis, how we assess students has become a common concern among educators. Traditional assessment methods may not always be the best, or most practical, option in online settings. One approach to online assessment is the use of screencasting. While screencasting is often a replacement for lectures in an online environment and has recently been used to provide student feedback, screencasting can do so much more. It can offer a path for students to demonstrate their knowledge and provide insight for instructors on student thought processes. While focused on preservice teachers, the use of screencasts in classroom settings is also examined. 

The role of content specificity in situational interest and physical activity

Scott, L., Shen, B., Price, A., & Centeio, E. E. (2020). The role of content specificity in situational interest and physical activity. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 91, 127-135.

Purpose: To identify the role of content specificity in moderating situational interest and its relationship with physical activity (PA), we examined the between- and within-content relations of situational interest and PA in an urban elementary physical education context using fitness and basketball as comparative contents. Method: Fourth and fifth graders (N = 125) completed questionnaires and wore pedometers to assess situational interest and PA across a fitness unit and a basketball unit, respectively. Results: Based on our confirmatory factor analyses and fit indexes, situational interest, and PA demonstrated strong content specificity. Strengths of associations between the two units differed by situational interest dimensions and PA (r ≤ .50). Within-content interrelations of these dimensions and PA were not consistent (X2 Decrease ≥ 3.40, p < .05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that content specificity in physical education plays a significant role in moderating students’ motivation and its function on PA.

Considerations for facilitating refugee acculturation through groups

Atiyeh, S., Choudhuri, D. D. & Dari, T. (2020). Considerations for facilitating refugee acculturation through groups. The Journal for Specialists in Group Work. 

Globally, there are 70.8 million forcibly displaced people made up of 41.3 million internally displaced, 25.9 million refugees, and 3.5 million asylum seekers. Refugees have significant mental health needs and face multiple barriers to obtaining adequate mental health care. The acculturation process can complicate and exacerbate mental health symptoms. In this article, the authors discuss relevant cultural factors and present possible group interventions to address acculturation with refugee groups.

MOOCs and Open Education: Future opportunities

Reynolds, T., Reeves, T., Bonk, C., & Zhang, K., (2020). MOOCs and Open Education: Future opportunities, in K. Zhang, C.J. Bonk, T. Reeves and T. Reynolds (Eds.) (2020), MOOCs and Open Education in the Global South: Challenges, Successes, and Opportunities, 342-350. NY: Routledge.

Game Development-Based Learning: A New Paradigm for Teaching Computer and Object-Oriented Programming

Al-Makhzoomy, A. K., Zhang, K., & Spannaus, T. (2020). Game Development-Based Learning: A New Paradigm for Teaching Computer and Object-Oriented Programming. In R. Zheng (Ed.), Examining Multiple Intelligences and Digital Technologies for Enhanced Learning Opportunities (pp. 244-259). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi:10.4018/978-1-7998-0249-5.ch012.

This chapter presents the findings from a quasi-experimental study analyzing the effect of Game Development-Based Learning on students’ academic performance in programming courses in Jordan. The study tested an argument proposing a positive significant association between GDBL instruction and students’ performance. The analysis of variance results investigating the effect of enrollment and completion of a concurrent GDBL course to normal courses found that the treatment group outperformed two other groups: the control and the comparison group. The positive gains in the post-assessment scores, were consistent across the two programming courses: C++ and Object-Oriented Programming. This finding confirms the earlier results across countries and contexts documenting the salubrious effect of GDBL on students’ academic performance in Computer Science and Information Technology courses. Findings also support the overarching constructionist approach where the use of scaffolding and technology in instruction and assessment yield better academic outcomes for learners. Game DevelopmentBased Learning: A New Paradigm for Teaching Computer and Object-Oriented Programming

Preparing industry-ready engineers with virtual reality: recent research and future directions, the International Journal of Smart Technology and Learning

Zhang, K., & Aslan, A. B. (in press). Preparing industry-ready engineers with virtual reality: recent research and future directions, the International Journal of Smart Technology and Learning.

Focusing on virtual reality (VR) in undergraduate engineering education, this article examines research published in 2014-2020, critically reviews the state of VR research, and highlights its applications and educational benefits. More importantly, this article presents a new, comprehensive framework, namely VR for industry-ready engineers, and discusses future directions for research on and practice of VR in engineering education. The multi-phased conceptual work started with a series of search and selections of related research from the Web of Science and IEEE databases. 19 publications met all of the selection criteria and were fully analyzed. Multiple analyses were conducted, including bibliometrics, categorical meta-trends analysis and inductive content analysis, to discover the general trends and various characteristics of recent research. The new framework highlights four essential types of learning opportunities to prepare industry-ready engineers, it also summarizes the proven and promising VR applications to realize such opportunities. This article further proposes future directions for VR in engineering education, calls for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, suggests emerging research methods, and encourages longitudinal and large-scaled studies. Additionally, the article calls for critical awareness of present and potential issues and concerns in VR adoption in education. 

Smartphone apps for cancer: A content analysis of the digital health marketplace

Charbonneau, D., Hightower, S., Katz, A., Zhang, K., Abrams, J., Senft, N., Beebe-Dimmer, J. L., Heath, E., Eaton, T. & Thompson, H., (2020). Smartphone apps for cancer: A content analysis of the digital health marketplace, Digital Health, 6, 1-7. DOI: 10.1177/2055207620905413 

Attitudes towards Technology as Determinants of eHealth Activity among African American and White Cancer Survivors: A New Application of Theory, Health Communication

Eaton, T, Heath, E., & Thompson, H. S. (2019). Attitudes towards Technology as Determinants of eHealth Activity among African American and White Cancer Survivors: A New Application of Theory, Health Communication, DOI: 10.1080/10410236.2018.1563031.

MOOCs and Open Education in the Global South: Challenges, Successes and Opportunities

Zhang, K., Bonk, C., Reeves, T., Reynolds, T., (2020) (Eds.). MOOCs and Open Education in the Global South: Challenges, Successes and Opportunities. New York: Routledge.

With e-learning technologies evolving and expanding at high rates, organizations and institutions around the world are integrating massive open online courses (MOOCs) and other open educational resources (OERs). MOOCs and Open Education in the Global South explores the initiatives that are leveraging these flexible systems to educate, train, and empower populations previously denied access to such opportunities.

Featuring contributors leading efforts in rapidly changing nations and regions, this wide-ranging collection grapples with accreditation, credentialing, quality standards, innovative assessment, learner motivation and attrition, and numerous other issues. The provocative narratives curated in this volume demonstrate how MOOCs and OER can be effectively designed and implemented in vastly different ways in particular settings, as detailed by experts from Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, the Pacific/Oceania, and the Caribbean. 

This comprehensive text is an essential resource for policy makers, instructional designers, practitioners, administrators, and other MOOC and OER community stakeholders.

MOOCs and open education-Wandering and winding our way to today

Bonk, C., Zhang, K., Reeves, T., & Reynolds, T. (2020). Preface: MOOCs and open education—Wandering and winding our way to today in K. Zhang, C.J. Bonk, T. Reeves and T. Reynolds (Eds.) (2020), MOOCs and Open Education in the Global South: Challenges, Successes, and Opportunities (pp. xvi-xxxiii). NY: Routledge

MOOCs and Open Education in the Global South: Successes and Challenges

Zhang, K., Bonk, C., Reeves, T., & Reynolds, T. (2020). MOOCs and Open Education in the Global South: Successes and Challenges, in K. Zhang, C.J. Bonk, T. Reeves and T. Reynolds (Eds.) (2020), MOOCs and Open Education in the Global South: Challenges, Successes, and Opportunities, 1-14. NY: Routledge.

Ageing transmigrants and the decolonisation of life course

Hepburn, S., & Coloma, R. S. (2020). Ageing transmigrants and the decolonisation of life course. In S. Guo & S. Maitra (Eds.), Decolonising lifelong learning in the age of transnational migration (pp. 48-66). Routledge.

This paper examines how ageing transmigrants engage in practises that serve to decolonise life course in order to create increased opportunities to live well. It analyses the experiences of Jamaican Canadian older adults (age 60 and older) who decided to remain in Canada, return to Jamaica, or travel between countries after retirement. As transmigrants with racialised minority and diasporic backgrounds, they grapple with questions of financial, socio-cultural, and emotional well-being that become more complicated and multi-layered in later life. This qualitative study utilises multi-sited ethnography to collect data in Canada and Jamaica. It also engages with the work of cultural critic Sylvia Wynter whose conceptions of decolonisation and humanism serve to reveal more diversified life course and ageing experiences. As postcolonial nation-states, Canada and Jamaica become ambivalent and vexed sites of home, belonging, security, and movement. Through decolonisation, transmigrants learn and unlearn how to navigate these spaces in ways that illuminate the ongoing struggles and pleasures of the quotidian within the broader contexts of transnational social fields.

Managing Outliers in Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire Data

Lee, M. S., Carcone, A. I., Ko, L., Kulik, N., Ellis, D. A., & Naar, S. (2020). Managing Outliers in Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire Data. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Abstract Objective
The goal of this study was to explore the impact of 5 decision rules for removing outliers from adolescent food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) data.

Design
This secondary analysis used baseline and 3-month data from a weight loss intervention clinical trial.

Participants
African American adolescents (n = 181) were recruited from outpatient clinics and community health fairs.

Variables Measured
Data collected included self-reported FFQ and mediators of weight (food addiction, depressive symptoms, and relative reinforcing value of food), caregiver-reported executive functioning, and objectively measured weight status (percentage overweight).

Analysis
Descriptive statistics examined patterns in study variables at baseline and follow-up. Correlational analyses explored the relationships between FFQ data and key study variables at baseline and follow-up.

Results
Compared with not removing outliers, using decision rules reduced the number of cases and restricted the range of data. The magnitude of baseline FFQ-mediator relationships was attenuated under all decision rules but varied (increasing, decreasing, and reversing direction) at follow-up. Decision rule use increased the magnitude of change in FFQ estimated energy intake and significantly strengthened its relationship with weight change under 2 fixed range decision rules.

Final Report from IBPRO: Impact of Multidisciplinary Collaboration on Research in Radiation Oncology Radiation Research

Burmeister, J.W., Dominello, M.M., Tracey, M.W. Kacin, S.E., & Joiner, M.C. (2020). Final Report from IBPRO: Impact of Multidisciplinary Collaboration on Research in Radiation Oncology Radiation Research. Radiation Research.

An important hallmark of the field of radiation oncology has traditionally been multidisciplinary collaboration amongst its clinicians and scientists. Increased specialization, resulting from increased complexity, threatens to diminish this important characteristic. This article evaluates the success of a short-term educational environment developed specifically to enhance multidisciplinary collaboration. The NIH-funded educational course developed at Wayne State University called “Integration of Biology and Physics into Radiation Oncology (IBPRO)” was designed to facilitate the engagement of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiobiologists in activities that foster collaborative investigation. The question we ask here is “Did it work?”
   
The 240 clinicians and researchers participating in IBPRO over the five years of the course were surveyed to quantify its effectiveness. In total, 95 respondents identified 45 institutional protocols, 52 research grants (19 of which have been funded thus far), 94 research manuscripts, and 106 research presentations as being attributable to participation in IBPRO. The majority (66%) of respondents reported generating at least one of these research metrics attributable to participation in IBPRO and these participants reported an average of nearly 5 such quantitative research metrics per respondent. This represents a remarkable contribution to radiation oncology research within a relatively short period of time through an intervention involving a relatively small number of radiation oncology professionals. Nearly two thirds of respondents reported ongoing collaborative working relationships generated by IBPRO. In addition, approximately half of respondents stated that specific information presented at IBPRO changed the way they practice, and 95% of respondents practicing in a clinical setting stated that, since participation in IBPRO, they have approached clinical dilemmas more collaboratively. Many collaborative working relationships generated by this course are still actively driving research productivity and the creation of a new debate series in a professional journal is just one of the many enduring legacies of this course. IBPRO serves as a model for our ability to leverage collaborative learning in an educational intervention to foster multidisciplinary clinical and research collaboration. It has already had a profound impact on the profession of radiation oncology and this impact can be anticipated to increase in the future.

Nurturing the generation and exploration of mathematical conjectures with preservice teachers: An example with a perimeters task. Journal of Mathematics Education at Teachers College

Meagher, M. S., Özgün-Koca, S. A., & Edwards, M. T. (2020). Nurturing the generation and exploration of mathematical conjectures with preservice teachers: An example with a perimeters task. Journal of Mathematics Education at Teachers College, 11(1),13-20.

Generating mathematical conjectures is an important mathematical habit of mind for preservice teachers to develop so that they can, in turn, help their students to develop this skill. In this paper we present a classroom episode in which preservice mathematics teachers experience conjecturing in the context of a rich, open-ended task. They also reflect, throughout the task, on how they might nurture the generation and exploration of mathematical conjectures with their own students.

A critical autoethnography of a Black man teaching engineering to Black boys

Holly, Jr., J. (2020). A critical autoethnography of a Black man teaching engineering to Black boys. Journal of African American Males in Education, 11(2), 25-42.

It is widely publicized in scholarly and practitioner spaces that Black male students are underrepresented in engineering and related fields. Black boys generally have limited experiences with engineering courses and programs throughout their educational careers in primary and secondary school. More information about how Black boys are taught in engineering spaces is required to address this imbalance. In this critical autoethnography, I share my experiences with teaching Black boys engineering in an after-school program. This study incorporates the use of culturally relevant pedagogy as the theoretical framework and reports findings that capture the essence of my experiences, thoughts, and perspectives on teaching Black boys in engineering spaces. This study calls for more research on Black men teaching and Black boys’ learning in engineering settings.

Disentangling engineering education research's anti‐Blackness

Holly, Jr., J. (2020). Disentangling engineering education research's anti‐Blackness. Journal of Engineering Education, 109(4), 1-7. 

As a Black male educator and researcher, I am keenly aware that the epistemological, ontological, and axiologicalperspective I (and others like me) bring to the engineering education research community is often rejected if not justneglected or devalued. This realism precedes America's establishment and has since fueled its existence(Madhubuti, 1994; Shujaa, 1993). Likewise, Wharton (1992) aptly details the ways in which engineering education(i.e., collegiate engineering study)“has been a preserve of the white power structure since its inception”(p. xi). Yet, in the spirit of Maya Angelou“I rise,”telling my story (Holly, 2018) as an educative counter-narrative (Hughes &Pennington, 2017; Solórzano & Yosso, 2002a) to elucidate and disentangle the anti-Blackness endemic in engineeringeducation research. With this editorial, I will provide a brief elaboration on anti-Blackness and the ways it manifests inengineering education research; then I present research practices that can help engineering educators conduct research that is pro-Black (the antithesis of anti-Black).

The mantle of agency: Principals’ use of teacher evaluation policy

Lewis, J. M., Reid, D. B., Bell, C. A., Jones, N., & Qi, Y. (2020). The mantle of agency: Principals’ use of teacher evaluation policy. Leadership and Policy in Schools. 

Understanding Consequential Assessment Systems for Teachers (UCAST) studied a large urban school district in the United States as it adopted a new teacher evaluation system. This project studied 1,000 principals as they were trained to use this new system, and followed them into their first three years of implementation. This article features a multiple-case case study of three of these school principals. Findings indicate principals exercise professional judgment by donning evaluation policy as a “mantle of agency” for working toward a host of aims sometimes aligned with and sometimes antithetical to stated policy. Implications for policy and practice are discussed.

Fostering middle school teachers’ mathematical knowledge for teaching via analysis of tasks and student work

Koca, S.A., Edwards, T., and Lewis, J. M. (2020). Fostering middle school teachers’ mathematical knowledge for teaching via analysis of tasks and student work. Mathematics Teacher Educator.

Mathematical knowledge for teaching is a complex web of knowledge domains. In this article, we share findings from an 18-month professional development project that aimed to improve middle school mathematics teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) of proportional reasoning by focusing on the critical analysis of mathematical tasks and student work. Although multiple studies have shown that professional development can contribute to teachers' MKT globally, little is known about how this knowledge grows and how specific domains of MKT can be targeted through professional development. Findings in this study show how professional development positively influenced participants' knowledge of content and teaching and knowledge of content and students, two domains of MKT, through teachers' twinned analyses of tasks and student work in proportional reasoning.

An effective way of designing blended learning: A three-phase design-based research approach

Ustun, A.B. & Tracey, M.W. (2019). An effective way of designing blended learning: A three-phase design-based research approach. Education and Information Technologies.

Online learning is common in higher education, but has its drawbacks. As a result, blended learning (BL) has emerged as an alternative to alleviate the challenges of online learning. The purpose of this design-based research study was to determine what elements were needed to assist a higher education instructor inexperienced in designing and teaching a BL course to successfully create and implement it, and to document the instructor’s perceptions about the first experience of teaching a BL course. The BL course was designed, imple- mented and redesigned to make the BL course an effective and efficient learning environment through the three phases of this design-based research. Qualitative and quantitative research methods including instructor interviews, learning environment observations and student surveys were employed to col- lect data. Results indicated that iterative analysis, design and evaluation of the created BL course provided an opportunity for the researchers to find applicable solutions to any real-world problems that the instructor faced in the course. Besides, the design and implementation of BL led the instructor to shift from a passive teaching approach to an active teaching approach and allowed the students to become active and interactive learners through the process of three iterative design cycles. Although challenges were identified, she had an overall positive perception toward teaching the BL course.
   
 Online learning is common in higher education, but has its drawbacks. As a result, blended learning (BL) has emerged as an alternative to alleviate the challenges of online learning. The purpose of this design-based research study was to determine what elements were needed to assist a higher education instructor inexperienced in designing and teaching a BL course to successfully create and implement it, and to document the instructor’s perceptions about the first experience of teaching a BL course. The BL course was designed, imple- mented and redesigned to make the BL course an effective and efficient learning environment through the three phases of this design-based research. Qualitative and quantitative research methods including instructor interviews, learning environment observations and student surveys were employed to col- lect data. Results indicated that iterative analysis, design and evaluation of the created BL course provided an opportunity for the researchers to find applicable solutions to any real-world problems that the instructor faced in the course. Besides, the design and implementation of BL led the instructor to shift from a passive teaching approach to an active teaching approach and allowed the students to become active and interactive learners through the process of three iterative design cycles. Although challenges were identified, she had an overall positive perception toward teaching the BL course.

Fostering middle school teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching via analysis of tasks and student work

Özgün-Koca, S. A., Lewis, J. M., & Edwards, T. G. (2020). Fostering middle school teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching via analysis of tasks and student work. Mathematics Teacher Educator, 9(1), 50-62.

Mathematical knowledge for teaching is a complex web of knowledge domains. In this article, we share findings from an 18-month professional development project that aimed to improve middle school mathematics teachers’ mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) of proportional reasoning by focusing on the critical analysis of mathematical tasks and student work. Although multiple studies have shown that professional development can contribute to teachers’ MKT globally, little is known about how this knowledge grows and how specific domains of MKT can be targeted through professional development. Findings in this study show how professional development positively influenced participants’ knowledge of content and teaching and knowledge of content and students, two domains of MKT, through teachers’ twinned analyses of tasks and student work in proportional reasoning.

An integrated biology and mathematics activity to investigate photosynthesis and linear relationships

Sönmez, D. & Özgün-Koca, S. A. (2020). An integrated biology and mathematics activity to investigate photosynthesis and linear relationships. American Biology Teacher, 82(7), 488-493.

An activity that effectively integrates both mathematics and biology concepts through technology and proposes multiple learning modes for students through real-world context.

Creating STEM Pathways at Detroit’s Aquarium

Ram, J., Yarema, S., Chadde, J., Teisan, J., Emmert, A., Tate, M., & McGhee, M. (2020). Creating STEM Pathways at Detroit’s Aquarium. 2020 STEM for all: Video Showcase. TERC (National Science Foundation). 

Voted Facilitator's Choice Award. Video showcase of NST ITEST Project: Promoting Student Interest in Science and Science Careers Through a Scalable Program at a Public Aquarium: Minorities are underrepresented in science careers on a national level. To address the disparity of minorities in science careers, we must create learning opportunities by empowering teachers with tools and exposing children from early on to the endless possibilities that STEM learning has to offer. Fifth grade is considered a critical age at which decisions for lifelong science-related career choices are formed. To expand opportunities to participate in place-based STEM activities in an urban school system with a high proportion of underrepresented minorities, this project provides fifth grade teachers and their students in Detroit with learning opportunities at Detroit's Belle Isle Aquarium. Hands-on workshops for teachers and Aquarium field trips and activities for students are designed to spark excitement in STEM and to start students down a pathway to science-associated careers. 

What do STEM careers look like in Southeastern Michigan?

Yarema, S. (2019). What do STEM careers look like in Southeastern Michigan? AEOP blog.

A Partnership to Promote interest in STEM among underrepresented k-12 students in Southeast Michigan was established between Wayne State University's College of Education Upward Bound Program and the SE Michigan Regional Junior Science & Humanities Symposium (JSHS), an existing Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP), hosted annually by the COE at WSU. The partnership engaged the Upward Bound students as a way to directly increase participation of underrepresented high school students in the South East Michigan regional JSHS, to showcase these high school students’ STEM research. 

Partnership to Promote Interest in STEM Among Underrepresented k-12 Students in Southeast Michigan

Yarema, S. (2019). Partnership to Promote Interest in STEM Among Underrepresented k-12 Students in Southeast Michigan. MSTA Journal, 64(1), 3 – 7.

Announcement of Results of regional competition- 56th Annual SE MI Junior Science & Humanities Symposium, hosted by the COE at WSU, describing how the partnership with the WSU COE Upward Bound Program successfully engaged underrepresented high school students in STEM research. 

Fostering shared decisions to promote literacy: Strategies for talking with families

Hancock, C. L. (2020). Fostering shared decisions to promote literacy: Strategies for talking with families. Michigan Reading Journal, 52(3), 44-51.

Families play a critical role in their child’s literacy learning. Disconnects between family and school literacy practices can result in missed opportunities for families and educators to collaboratively promote children’s literacy. In addition, a deficit-based perspective regarding family practices can further marginalize families and impair efforts at partnerships. As a result, early childhood educators often struggle to build meaningful partnerships with families for children’s literacy. Thus, a gap exists between the intent of recommendations such as those in the Essential Instructional Practices and shared decision-making by educators and families. Because decision-making takes place through language, educators must consider intricacies of communication when exploring how decisions to promote literacy are made. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to examine how PK-3 educators and parents communicate as they discuss family literacy practices. I argue that when educators attend to details of language use, they can better facilitate shared decisions that build on family knowledge, priorities, and culture, thereby promoting children’s literacy. I first briefly discuss decision-making, discourse, and power. Next, I synthesize empirical research to present recommendations for PK-3 educators to foster collaborative decisions regarding family literacy.
 

What Triplett never found and what Lewin never said first Kinesiology Review

Martin, J. (2020). What Triplett never found and what Lewin never said first Kinesiology Review, 9(2), 89-91.

The purpose of this brief commentary is to address misinformation that frequently appears in many sport psychology publications. I discuss two historical giants in social psychology, Norman Triplett and Kurt Lewin, that are frequently cited in sport psychology publications. Unfortunately, the typical commentary on these two social scientists and the significant events they are linked to is quite often wrong. I discuss relevant papers that clearly document that Triplett did not find evidence of social facilitation based on modern statistical approaches. Additionally, I provide historical evidence that shows many authors expressed the phrase “There is nothing as practical as a good theory”, or variants of it, before Lewin did. I encourage sport psychology authors to, at a minimum, provide more nuanced overviews of both Triplett and Lewin in in future writings.

Decision-making during early intervention home visits: From minimal to meaningful parent participation

Hancock, C. L., & Cheatham, G. A. (2020). Decision-making during early intervention home visits: From minimal to meaningful parent participation. Journal of Research in Childhood Education. Advance online publication. 

Family-early educator partnerships are foundational to early childhood and early childhood special education, and collaborative decision-making regard- ing child and family need is recognized as a critical component of these partnerships. This study investigated how two Part C early intervention home visitors and four parents communicated during home visits, and discursively selected strategies to promote children’s development. The following research questions were addressed: (1) How is decision-making constructed through discourse by parents and home visitors during home visits? (2) How do decision-making structures contribute to parent participation in decision- making? Analysis of home visit transcripts and interviews with home visitors indicated that how home visitors introduced the opportunity to make a decision and addressed options with families played an essential role in the extent to which parents meaningfully participated in decision-making. Although home visitors intended to provide parents with opportunities for full participation, this was not consistently realized during home visits. Home visitors predominantly initiated and controlled discussion topics. Features of words spoken and actions taken through language contributed to interactional construction of home visitors as assessors and advice givers, with parents in more passive roles, such as informants and advice followers. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Art therapy, community, activism and outcomes

Feen-Calligan, H. Moreno, J., & Buzzard, E. (2020). Art therapy, community, activism and outcomes. In T. Shafir, H. Orkibi, F.A. Baker, D Gussak & G. Kamal (Eds.) The State of the Art in Creative Arts Therapies. Lausanne: Frontiers Media SA. doi: 10.3389/978-2-88963-561-0 Apple Books.

This is a descriptive study of two groups who came together through a service-learning assignment: The first group is art therapy students enrolled in a research class who worked with six community agencies to help them prepare for undergraduate service-learning placements in an upcoming semester; they also assisted the agencies with program evaluation. The second group is the six community agency directors who were planning for service-learners enrolled in an art history class titled Art as A Social Practice. Service-learning is an experiential learning pedagogy where community service is integrated into an academic course, and where the services performed meet genuine community needs. The hyphen in service-learning represents the ideal that both students and community agencies experience benefits from the relationship, although in reality, it is often the experiences of the students rather than the agencies who help prepare them that receive greater attention in the scholarly research and literature. The present study places focus on the community agencies who, in the process of meeting with arts faculty to plan a service-learning course, made two unexpected requests: First they expressed their strong desire for student placements that were longer than one semester, and secondly, they all requested assistance with evaluating the effectiveness of their programs. This chapter is about the efforts to respond to these requests through the assistance of art therapy research students. With growing trends in community-based art therapy practice, greater attention to the community agencies where art therapists work is necessary and valuable to art therapy preparation. The chapter describes six distinctive communities, illustrating new frontiers of practice. The research students’ experiences and the experiences of the community partners were assessed using qualitative methods that included pre and post questionnaires, written reflections of students, interviews of agency directors and agency/student/researcher focus group transcripts. This study will inform other art therapy programs who may want to use a service-learning approach to teaching research. A discussion of the promising practices of service-learning and research, as well as some challenges leads to recommendations for art therapy education.

Art Therapy with Syrian Refugees: An Intervention Study

Feen-Calligan, H., Ruvolo Grasser, L., Debryn, J., Nasser, S., Jackson, C., Seguin, D., & Javanbakht, A. (2020). Art Therapy with Syrian Refugees: An Intervention Study. The Arts in Psychotherapy, 69.

This article describes a 12-week intervention program for Syrian refugee youth who have lived in the U.S. for approximately one year. The purpose of this study was to identify and develop art therapy interventions that would reduce stress and severity of trauma-related psychopathology while providing coping skills for youth aged 17 and under. Psychological questionnaire data were collected to obtain subjective and objective changes in trauma-related symptoms over the course of the art therapy program. The findings incited a large statistically significant effect of art therapy on posttraumatic stress and separation anxiety (p = .05; d >.8) compared to no treatment controls, and moderate effects of art therapy on anxiety, panic disorder, and GAD (d >.5) compared to no treatment controls. The reduction in stress was reflected behaviorally in participants’ positive affect, increased interest in art activities and increased coping (as evidenced through interaction with media, problem solving, participant initiated coping strategies and social support). The paper includes a review of relevant literature, description of select interventions, and recommendations for future work in art therapy with refugees.

Decolonizing urban education. Educational Studies

Coloma, R. S. (2020). Decolonizing urban education. Educational Studies, 56(1), 1-17.

Drawing insights primarily from Ethnic Studies, this essay is broken into the following components: outlining the elusive task of defining urban; delineating three decolonizing moves in relation to representation, structure, and affect; and ending with the ongoing struggles for Ethnic Studies in PK-12 schools and higher education. The goal is to sharpen nuestra facultad and deeply engage with el sitio y la lengua of urban schools and communities in order to unpack what has been normalized, construed as common sense and, therefore, taken for granted. An earlier version of this essay was given as the author’s presidential address at the 2019 annual meeting of the American Educational Studies Association in Baltimore, Maryland.

Unresolved feelings: Notes on pleasure and pain from an accidental educator

Coloma, R. S. (2020). Unresolved feelings: Notes on pleasure and pain from an accidental educator. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 33(6), 649-662.

This essay – written autobiographically as a confession – charts uncomfortably and reflexively salient experiences and emotions of a queer educator of color. It unveils and analyzes unresolved feelings as messy examples in his journey as an urban school teacher, as a graduate student, and eventually as a university academic and administrator. In particular, it foregrounds the pleasure-pain dynamic that will be addressed, although often intertwined, separately for fuller exposition and examination. Drawing interpretive and methodological insights from women of color feminism, the essay enacts a theorizing from the personal to work against facile understanding of the cultural politics of identity and emotion. Rather, it marks a queer of color critique that is grounded in feminist theorizing as a framework and language for a more livable and humane world.

Grants: The good, the bad, the ugly, and the puzzling Kinesiology Review

Martin, J. (2020). Grants: The good, the bad, the ugly, and the puzzling Kinesiology Review.

Grants play a major role in higher education, including kinesiology. However, critical commentaries on the role of external funds appear nonexistent in kinesiology. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to outline the most common criticisms of grants to stimulate a conversation in kinesiology. First, I first discuss benefits of grants. Second, I examine the role of grants in higher education. Third, I discuss how external funds are not required to contribute meaningful research. Fourth, I examine how a major reason for grants, to produce research publications, often goes weakly filled. Fifth, I show how the development of grant applications (especially unsuccessful applications) are an inefficient expenditure of resources. Sixth, I discuss how pursuing grants can be detrimental to other important academy goals. Seventh, I examine how grants may negatively influence faculty and administrator morale and quality of life. Eighth, I report on some common criticisms of the grant review process and discuss some alternative reviewing systems. Finally, I end with a brief summary and some recommendations.

The Discursive Politics of Education Policy in China: Educating Migrant Children

Yu, M., & Crowley, C. B. (2020). The Discursive Politics of Education Policy in China: Educating Migrant Children. The China Quarterly, 241, 87-111.

This article explores the discursive functioning of education policies, bringing into consideration community perspectives regarding policy enactment in contemporary China. With the intention of building upon ongoing discussions surrounding both the conceptions and purposes of policy sociology, we critically analyse policies directly related to the education of migrant children living in and around China's largest urban centres, with a specific focus on those implemented in Beijing. We emphasize two important aspects that previous studies of China's education policies have tended to underplay given their focus on social-economic perspectives. The first argument is that education policies have an underlying agenda that extends beyond that of simply addressing the educational needs of migrant children – evidenced through the discursive functions of policy texts. The second argument is related and seeks to raise questions about who is best served by these policies and for whom these policies are intended.

Sport psychology research: Proper standards and limitations

Martin, J., Beasley, V., & Guerrero, M. (2019). Sport psychology research: Proper standards and limitations. In M.H. Anshel (Ed.), Handbook of sport and exercise psychology. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. 
 

The potential for multi-site literacy interventions to reduce summer slide among low-performing students

Lenhoff, S. W., Somers, C., Tenelshof, B., & Bender, T. (2020). The potential for multi-site literacy interventions to reduce summer slide among low-performing students. Children and Youth Services Review, 110, 1–8. 

Despite the evidence that summer learning loss or “slide” can have devastating cumulative effects on student performance in school, there are few examples of system-wide interventions that can prevent summer learning loss at scale in urban contexts with high rates of low-performing students. This study reports on the first year of a city-wide effort to reduce summer literacy loss in Detroit, Michigan, through a multi-site collaboration between the city Parks and Recreation Department, the local public school district, and several unique program providers. Results from this pilot study suggest that short-duration, high-intensity tutoring may help to prevent learning loss in literacy among a population with high rates of socio-economic disadvantage and low initial performance, regardless of specific program methodologies. This study has implications for other large cities seeking to prevent summer slide by building on existing municipal and district infrastructure

The potential for continuous improvement to maximize the policy-relevance of research partnerships

Lenhoff, S. W., Singer, J., & Pogodzinski, B. (2020). The potential for continuous improvement to maximize the policy-relevance of research partnerships. In A. M. Urick, D. E. DeMatthews, & T. G. Ford (Eds.), Maximizing the policy-relevance of research for school improvement (pp. 189–216). Information Age Publishing.

This chapter addresses Lupton and Hayes’s (2018) call for educational researchers “to develop our own pedagogical dispositions and strategies towards policymaking” (p. 203) by considering the opportunities offered by improvement science and research partnerships. Both improvement science and research-practice partnerships (RPPs) are increasingly popular approaches to improving practices within schools, and a growing body of research demonstrates their potential to improve educational outcomes (see Bryk et al., 2015; Coburn & Penuel, 2016). Little research has investigated how these approaches might be beneficial in improving the quality and influence of research itself. By turning these approaches inward, can researchers use the principles of improvement science and RPPs to maximize the policy-relevance of school improvement research? This chapter addresses this question in three parts. First, We review the literature on improvement science and RPPs, and we consider how their core principles align with the interests of researchers seeking to produce policy-relevant work. Then, we analyze the key opportunities and challenges of enacting these principles by reflecting on our own research partnership grounded in improvement science. We conclude with important lessons for researchers who seek to influence policy through partnerships and suggest directions for future research and applications of improvement science in policy-focused research teams.

Unregulated open enrollment and inequitable access to schools of choice

Lenhoff, S. W. (2020). Unregulated open enrollment and inequitable access to schools of choice. Peabody Journal of Education, 95(3), 248–271. 

In severing the link between residential address and school assignment, school choice policies have the potential to decrease school segregation and increase educational equity. Yet this promise is undermined when school choice creates greater opportunity for those who are already privileged while limiting access to students from historically marginalized groups. This study combines data from a new survey of local open enrollment policies in Metro Detroit, student-level administrative records, and geographic data to critically analyze the local discretion provided in Michigan’s interdistrict school choice policy in relation to the goals of access to schools of choice, desegregation, and educational equity. I found that local school districts implement provisions of state policy in ways that restrict access to Black and economically disadvantaged students while creating pathways of opportunity for others. Districts are incentivized to implement these restrictions because of the inequities built into the state school funding formula and the racialized geography of Metro Detroit that is mechanized in district and county boundaries to restrict access. This study has implications for the regulation of local school choice markets and the role they play in increasing equitable public school opportunities.

A family systems perspective on paternal absence, presence, and engagement

Bocknek, E. L. (2020). A family systems perspective on paternal absence, presence, and engagement. In H. E. Fitzgerald, K. von Klitzing, N. Cabrera, T. Skjøthaug, & J. Scarano de Mendonça (Eds.), Handbook of fathers and child development - prenatal to preschool (pp. TBD). New York: Springer.

Adaptive parenting among low-income Black mothers and toddlers’ regulation of distress

Bocknek, E. L., Richardson, P., Raveau, H., & Iruka, I. (2020). Adaptive parenting among low-income Black mothers and toddlers’ regulation of distress. Child Development.

Parenting differs in purpose and strategy according to cultural background (Brooks‐Gunn & Markman, 2005; Iruka, LaForett, & Odom, 2012). The current study tests a unique latent factor score, Adaptive Parenting, that represents culturally‐relevant, positive parenting behaviors: maternal coping with stress through reframing, maternal scaffolding of toddlers’ learning during a low‐stress task, and maternal commands during a high‐stress task. Participants were Black mothers (N = 119; Mage = 27.78) and their 24‐ to 30‐month‐old toddlers. Families were part of a broader study examining family resilience among urban, low‐income young children and their families. Results demonstrate that the proposed variables align on a single factor and positively predict toddlers’ emotion regulation. Findings are discussed in the context of Black culturally‐specific parenting processes.

Digital reading strategies: How practices and applications compared to perceptions

Baleja, K. & Zhang, M. (2020). Digital reading strategies: How practices and applications compared to perceptions. In Proceedings of EdMedia + Innovate Learning (pp. 367-375). Online, The Netherlands: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).

Digital literacy is essential in education. Being able to not only successfully complete digital searches for information, but to comprehending the material as well are essential skills for today’s students. As technology continues to infiltrate our daily lives, literacy must become digital to keep pace. Because scholars continue to struggle to define digital literacy, deciding how to teach digital literacy fluctuates greatly from one class to the next. Surveying educators across the state of Michigan, this mixed-method study focusing on digital reading strategies, technologies, and perceptions. Educators continue to acknowledge the importance of teaching digital literacy yet they lack professional development and continuous support to sustain effective application. Teachers face many issues with integrating digital reading, including technology, time, and defining its aspects. The frequency of digital reading resources was found to be quite low compared to beliefs on digital reading, inviting an opportunity for future research to further understand digital literacy and how digital reading is taught in the classroom.

Collective trauma and community support: Lessons from Detroit. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, Special Issue: Commentaries on the Coronavirus Pandemic

Duane, A., Stokes, K., DeAngelis, C., & Bocknek, E. L. (2020). Collective trauma and community support: Lessons from Detroit. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, Special Issue: Commentaries on the Coronavirus Pandemic, 12(5), 452.

The COVID-19 crisis can be defined as a collective trauma, which contributes to an upheaval of community connection and functioning. The current pandemic has also illuminated disparities in mental health supports. In this commentary, we highlight one community organization, located in metro Detroit, that has responded to the trauma by bolstering resources and supports for residents, many of whom are ethnoracial minorities.

Hark, Hark! Hear the Story of a Science Educator! Professor Ali Eftekhari

Ebenezer, J. (2020). Hark, Hark! Hear the Story of a Science Educator! Professor Ali Eftekhari, PFHEA, Editor, Global Science Education, Belfast Academy, United Kingdom, CRC Press (Taylor & Francis).

Hark, Hark! Hear the Story of a Science Educator! is to empower public understanding of science teaching and learning. Situated in a personal narrative, this book appeals to a broad readership, including the worldwide travelers. 

The book begins with my academic journey that reveals how I establish my scholarly roots in research, teaching, and service, and highlights the struggles in my academic pursuit. A visiting professor calls me out boldly to engage in academic writing by this statement, "You are too lazy." I admonish that scholarly publications should begin in the doctoral coursework. Dissemination from the dissertation should waste no time. The inclusion of advisors as co-authors is to appreciate their involvement in building and shaping one's intellectual capacity. Pre-service teachers inspired the publication of my first two books for Learning to Teach Science and Becoming a Secondary Science Teacher by Merill, Prentice-Hall. The book narrates the luxurious World Bank Mission to Indonesia as the final evaluator for its seven-year $56M project. "The Science Banqueting Table" serves as a metaphor to reach all students. "You Reach" was my motto in China, Thailand, and India. I track my path from HyperCard to Artificial Intelligence for relational conceptual change inquiry. The Pythagorean Theorem serves as a metaphor for the architecture of curriculum design.

Weaving a localized context of use: What is means for instructional design

Baaki, J. & Tracey, M.W. (2019). Weaving a localized context of use: What is means for instructional design. Journal of Applied Instructional Design, 8 (1). 

In thinking about patient experience design and working to expand usability methodologies for healthcare, Meloncon (2017) concluded that current theoretical models of context are insufficient. Meloncon pointed to Rice (2012) who emphasized that context is complex, in constant motion, and not bounded as a self-contained situation. Rice presented context as an ecological network, which emphasizes the give-and-take and relationships between people, events, texts, and contexts of use. 

In 1997, Tessmer and Richey published The Role of Context in Learning and Instructional Design. According to Google Scholar the article has been cited over 300 times. Tessmer and Richey saw a need for a comprehensive view of contextual analysis in instructional design (ID). Their extensive theoretical model of context for ID included a conceptual model, an analysis model, and contextual examples and issues. Tessmer and Richey’s approach aligns well with Rice’s ecological model where context is negotiated as a network.

While the literature has scaled context as large and complex, Meloncon (2017) has called for scaling back the size of context to localized contexts of use. A localized context of use emphasizes specific moments of use where context is scaled back to what is needed in a situation or moment.

Our initial goal was to define context for ID. As we present, this was no easy task and ultimately led us down a road to synthesize what is a localized context of use for ID. Consequently, the purpose of our manuscript is to probe what a localized context of use means for the practice of ID and of environments in which learning occurs. Specifically, we look at the evolution of context in design, summarize Tessmer and Richey’s contextual approach to instruction, review context in ID since 1997, present our localized context of use through the actions of a learner and a designer, provide applications for practice, and implications for further research. Exploring context ultimately resulted in our decision that as it relates to a learner’s context and an instructional designer’s context, we side with a localized context of use.

Chapter 5: Program Planning in Public Health Nutrition: Essentials for Practitioner

Kulik, N., Dombrowski, R. & Barcelona, J. (2020). Chapter 5: Program Planning in Public Health Nutrition: Essentials for Practitioners. Eds. Jones-Smith, J.C.. Johns Hopkins University Press: Baltimore, MD.

Mobile Learning Technology Acceptance in Saudi Arabian Higher Education: An Extended Framework and A Mixed-Method Study, Education and Information Technologies

Alasmari, T., & Zhang, K. (2019), Mobile Learning Technology Acceptance in Saudi Arabian Higher Education: An Extended Framework and A Mixed-Method Study, Education and Information Technologies, (Official journal of International Federation of Information Processing (IFIP)’s Technical Committee on Education.

This article reports a two-phase study with (1) an extended framework on mobile learning technology acceptance, and (2) a mixed-method research investigating college students on the use and embracement of mobile learning technology acceptance in Saudi Arabia. The research extended the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) framework with constructs particularly concerning mobile learning technology. The sequential mixed-method study investigated college students’ mobile learning technology acceptance in Saudi Arabia, and also validated the extended framework with empirical data. A total of 1203 eligible college students, 591 male and 612 females, participated in the online survey, and 15 of them also participated in individual interviews afterward. A wide range of social media and social networking sites were used to recruit participants and collect data. The study found that variables like Learning Expectancy (LE), Effort Expectancy (EE), Social Influence (SI), and characteristics of mobile learning were significant predictors of students’ intentions to use mobile learning technologies, regardless of the moderating effects of gender, age, and eLearning experience. Social influence was the only construct that was found as moderated by gender, where men showed a stronger behavioral intention to use mobile learning technology than women. Facilitating Conditions (FC) and Self-Management of Mobile Learning (SMML) in this study were not significant in predicting students’ behavioral intention or their use behavior of mobile learning technology acceptance.

Empathic Design: Imagining the Cognitive and Emotional Learner Experience

Tracey, M.W. & Hutchinson, A. (2019). Empathic Design: Imagining the Cognitive and Emotional Learner Experience. Educational Technology Research and Development, 67(5) 1259-1272.

In an effort to create meaningful user experiences, instructional designers participate in continuous projection and reflection during design. Empathic design draws on instructional designers’ sensitivity toward their learners as a reference for design. Empathic forecasting, or predictions about an emotional reaction to future events, is an important influence on design in general and may be particularly meaningful for empathic design. This exploratory mixed-methods study examined how instructional designers’ imagined the cognitive and emotional learner experience as they designed a collaboration-based interactive case study to promote interaction and collaboration among physicians, radiobiologists, and radiation physicists. We employed a protocol analysis methodology to document the verbal exchanges of members of this design team during collaborative meetings. Online surveys that included scale-based ratings and short open-ended questions assessed learners’ perceptions of their instructional experience. Findings indicate that instructional designers visualized learner interaction with the Virtual Hospital, and emoted learner feelings with the activity while engaging in design. User results indicate that the outcome the instructional designers envisioned for the user experience aligned with user perceptions of their experiences during the activity.